• Callum Wilson went down under the challenge of Luke Shaw but got no penalty
  • Ex-referee Graham Poll felt Graham Scott should have pointed to the spot
  • The refereeing expert suggested that Scott’s view of the incident was not clear
  • And a camera angle similar to television pictures would have helped him award 

Nathan Salt For Mailonline

With Manchester United 1-0 up against Bournemouth early in the second half, Luke Shaw appeared to foul Cherries striker Callum Wilson in the penalty area but appeals were swiftly waved away by referee Graham Scott.

But former Premier League referee and Sportsmail columnist Graham Poll believes the Red Devils were fortunate to get away with the foul and felt Scott did not give it as his view was obstructed. 

Wilson was left incensed as he fell to the ground with an onrushing Shaw looking to nip in front of the striker.  

Callum Wilson went down under the challenge of Luke Shaw in the penalty area but no penalty

Callum Wilson went down under the challenge of Luke Shaw in the penalty area but no penalty

Appeals were waved away but refereeing expert Graham Poll suggested the call was wrong

Appeals were waved away but refereeing expert Graham Poll suggested the call was wrong

Appeals were waved away but refereeing expert Graham Poll suggested the call was wrong

The striker was incensed and Poll felt the referee's view of the penalty foul was obstructed

The striker was incensed and Poll felt the referee's view of the penalty foul was obstructed

The striker was incensed and Poll felt the referee’s view of the penalty foul was obstructed

‘Yes it was a wrong call, it’s definitely as penalty,’ said Poll on BT Sport after the game. 

‘For Graham Scott it’s a really hard call to make. It’s a quick break and he just doesn’t have the angle to see Luke Shaw holding Wilson there. 

‘We question the assistant, very good on offsides, but he could help the referee here. It’s definitely a penalty and furthermore, if you think Wilson is going to score then you’ve got to be sending (Shaw) off.

‘That is a deliberate foul and the double jeopardy rule only comes in if it’s an accidental foul. If you try and play the ball and accidentally trip the opponent then it’s a foul, a penalty but you don’t send them off. You’ve got to send him off. If, however, it’s not an accidental foul – that isn’t – that is a red card.

Poll said that the incident should have resulted in a penalty and sending off for Shaw

Poll said that the incident should have resulted in a penalty and sending off for Shaw

Poll said that the incident should have resulted in a penalty and sending off for Shaw

‘I think in the immediate aftermath they won’t be aware of it. Harry (Leonard, linesman) will say he didn’t think it was and they’ll let it pass.

‘It’s only when they watch the playback that they’ll see it. This is a perfect advert for VAR. It shows it’s definitely a foul and I think Chris Smalling knew as well. VAR would clear it up in seconds.

‘As I say you’ve got to be 100 per cent sure.’

The decision would have been a crucial one as United then went on to score again through substitute Romelu Lukaku and take the game away from the hosts. 

Eddie Howe’s side also felt aggrieved when Josh King’s shirt was being pulled by Phil Jones in the area but again, appeals were ignored.  

Television angles helped clear up whether the call was right or wrong and Poll said it was hard

Television angles helped clear up whether the call was right or wrong and Poll said it was hard

Television angles helped clear up whether the call was right or wrong and Poll said it was hard

The camera behind the goal is what Poll feels would have helped Graham Scott give the call

The camera behind the goal is what Poll feels would have helped Graham Scott give the call

The camera behind the goal is what Poll feels would have helped Graham Scott give the call

 

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